6 Easy Ways To Find A Good Dog Training Professional

Finding A Good Dog Training Professional
With so many people advertising in the field of professional dog training today, trying to determine who’s truly qualified to look after your dog can be overwhelming. What to look for when choosing a professional to help you with dog training :

1) A good reputation, ask around and get recommendations from your vet, other dog owners, or local kennel clubs.
2) Experience. – Inquire about their background, i.e. number of years experience.
3)A genuine love of and devotion to dogs.
4) Extensive and up to date knowledge. Dedicated trainers keep themselves updated by attending dog training and animal behavior courses, conferences, seminars and workshops.
5) Their training methodology and handling skills. A good trainers first concern should be the dogs well being.
6) Memberships with reputable associations, organizations and training clubs.

General Dog Obedience Tips
Training should be a positive and enjoyable experience for both you and your dog. If you are not in the right mood for training, don’t even begin. Always reward your dog for obeying your commands promptly! A reward is anything that your dog wants and is willing to work for. Treats are an obvious reward but other rewards could be verbal praise and toys. Several shorter sessions are usually better than one long one. Training should not involve any negative components or punishment . There should be no shouting, no hitting or smacking, no chain jerking on choke chains or collars, and absolutely no electric shocking! Each training session should be enjoyable and positive with rewards for jobs well done.

Training With Head Collars
Pulling on the lead is one of the few unpleasant experiences of bringing up a new puppy or dog. Using a head collar for dog training has become very popular over the last few years. Training with a head collar does have some advantages over the traditional training collar. Although very simple to use, it is important that head collars are fitted correctly and your dog properly introduced to the collar. Head collars are generally more intuitive to use than a traditional training collar. Head collars are very effective when controlling dogs in difficult situations.

Clicks Instead Of ‘Good Boy’ For Dog Training

The first major improvement in dog training since choke chains and spiked collars, click and treat has quickly establishing itself in becoming a big hit in the world of dog training. Currently, there are over 10,000 trainers who are using this training method everyday.

One advantage to using this form of training at home is it’s easy to learn for both the dog and his trainer!

Originally used to train marine mammals, click and treat breaks down the process into two separate steps, information and motivation. The click is the information, the treat is the motivation. While other trainers still work on these two steps, they try to teach them all at once, which can confuse the animal and slow down results.

Most trainers will verbally praise a dog for good behavior, while at the same time motivating the dog to repeat his actions. This can be a good method, however it takes longer for the dog to understand which behaviors and actions caused the praise from the trainer.

With the click and treat method, the processes are easily taught. In normal training, a person would say “good boy” when a welcomed action occurs and proceed with giving a treat. The clicker becomes a substitute for verbal praise and can actually catch the “good boy” behavior quicker than saying it, letting the dog know exactly which behavior he is being rewarded for.

Another way to look at click and treat training is viewing it as a secondary reinforcement, while food, water, physical affection and play (things the dog wants) become primary reinforcement. When you take a dog for a walk, the leash works as a secondary reinforcement. It is obvious to the dog that the leash is not taking him for a walk; the owner is, however, it triggers a reaction in the dog, telling him that the leash will let him know where he will go and where he will not. And if he reacts to the leash with good behavior, his reward will be a nice leisurely walk.

Click and treat works the same way. When a dog hears the clicker, he will know that he performed a good behavior and as long as he keeps hearing a click, there is a treat coming his way. So, the clicker works as a secondary reinforcement, teaching him boundaries and appropriate behavior.

A couple advantages of the click and treat method include;

1) Faster response than verbal praise. The clicker can identify the exact behavior at the time it happens.

2) It takes the place of treats. While motivating the dog to hear clicks, it will also teach him to work without the expectations of having treats given to him each time he does something good.

3) If the trainer is working at a distance from the dog, the clicker will still work, without having to be right next him.

Are you ready to try clicker training?

The first thing you’ll need to do is go to your favorite pet supply store and invest in a clicker. The clicker is nothing fancy and should just cost you under five dollars. While you’re there grab some pocket treats, little bits of dried liver work well.

A good method to use when getting started with click and treat is to stand in front of the animal. Click the clicker and give a treat. Continue doing this for 20-30 minutes, or until the dog becomes startled by the sound of the click. This will familiarize him to the clicking sound, while teaching him that every time he hears it, he has done something good. After he gets the hang of it, begin by adding commands, such as “sit” and “stay.”

Click and treat has proven to be a simple, yet consistent training method with quick results. So for the trainers out there who are looking for a new and innovative way to motivate and praise their animals, get out there, buy a clicker and… click!

‘Sit Up’ Buddy: Training Your Dog To Sit Like You

The trick of “sitting up” is easily taught to small dogs, but should try not be included in a big dog’s education, as it is difficult for them to preserve their balance.

The training of sitting up is one of the first tricks to teach and forms the groundwork for many other dog tricks. To train a dog to sit up, prepare some treats as a reward, and set your dog on his haunches in a corner, so that he cannot fall either backward or sideways and has very little or no space to lose balance.

Keep him from pitching forward by holding one hand under his chin and with the other hand hold the treat above his nose and keep repeating distinctly and deliberately say, “sit up.” Do not make him sit up too long at any one time, but repeat the lesson frequently and reward him often with plentiful of praise and treats.

During his first lesson he will require considerable assistance from your hand to prevent him from pitching forward, but as he gets control of the balancing muscles and understands what you want, he will depend less and less upon your hand to keep him in position and you can gradually render him less assistance until you will only have to keep one hand in position two or three inches from his neck or chin, so as to be ready to prevent him pitching forward; later on you can withdraw this hand entirely and simply hold the treat just above the level of his head.

By constant practice he will sit up well after you set him up; then he should be set up against the wall, so as to afford him a support for his back only, and after he has been well schooled at this and can keep his position easily, practice him against chair legs, cushions or other objects that afford him less and less assistance, until finally he learns to preserve his balance and sits up without anything to lean against.

During all these lessons the words “sit up” have been impressed upon his mind by frequent repetition, and now comes the final lesson to teach him to sit up as soon as he hears the words, and the chances are, if he has been diligently drilled, it will be necessary only to call him out in the room, show him a treat, hold it up a suitable distance from the floor, say “sit up” and he will do so, when he should be given the treat while still in position.

The only necessity to perfection is to practice him several times a day until he will sit up at the word and without being shown a reward; that can be given him after he has obeyed.

You have now a foundation for many other tricks. He can be taught to beg by moving your hand up and down just in front of his paws, which he will move in unison with yours. He can also be taught to salute by bringing one paw up to the side of his head, or to hold a wooden pipe in his mouth, or to wear a cap on his head or other articles of wearing apparel.

In teaching a dog to submit to being dressed up, do not attempt to get him to wear too many things at once; try him at first with a cap and after he becomes accustomed to that you can put on a coat and gradually accustom him to the other clothing articles.

Enjoy teaching your dog the “sit up” trick and most importantly have fun along the way!

Correct Any Kind of Upsetting Behavior With Dog Training Collars

Using a dog training collar is an efficient and safe way to correct your dog’s unpleasant behavior. There are several types of dog training collars on the market, but they all operate according to the same system. The dogs learns in time to associate the unwanted behavior such as barking or going places it does not have permission to with a harmless yet unpleasant reaction generated by the training collar.

Initially, people developed dog training collars for hunting dogs. Those were shock-training collars. Such collars released a high level of electric current each time the dog misbehaved. These shock collars have undergone many modifications to be less cruel and painful to animals, but the controversy remains. Although such collars are not recommendable and are even under ban in some countries, they still exist on the market and are capable of releasing different levels of current. There is a lot of controversy surrounding shock-training collars and many people suggest to owners to try them on themselves before putting them on their dogs.

Recent studies have shown that dogs subjected to wearing an electric training collar have high levels of stress and are nervous around people, sometimes even attacking out of fear of shock. Since the apparition of electric dog training collars, many developments have taken place, which no longer hurt the dog physically, but make him uncomfortable by spraying a jet of scented air or water into the animal’s face.

Your pet will be so amazed and startled by the noise and sensation released by the dog training collar that it will stop barking. Barking is the dog’s natural way of noticing against potential dangers and scaring off threats. Dogs also bark to communicate with other dogs or with their owners. However, such behavior can become upsetting if every little thing triggers it.

Dog training collars are available for small or large dogs and the jet spray can have an unpleasant odor such as lemon, citronella or mustard. Some dog training collars do not have unpleasant odors because they emit a cold jet onto the dog’s neck to distract it from the unwanted behavior.

The market has seen the development of a new kind of dog training collar that emits sounds that only dogs can hear and that bother them. These ultrasonic collars are just as effective as citronella collars and electric collars and gradually replace electric collars.

These canine training collars use either sound or vibration to determine whether the dog is barking or not. The best ones use both types of sensors, so they do not accidentally release the spray because of outside sounds. You can use such training collars to confine your pet’s access to particular areas of your yard such as flower or vegetable beds. These invisible fences are very successful and your dog’s behavior will meet its adjustment in no time.

If you have tried everything to stop your dog from barking or digging up your flowers and nothing has worked, you should try a gentle dog training collar that just takes your dog by surprise and stops it from misbehaving. Improve the behavior of your dog by training it with the aid of a dog training collar that you can choose from a wide range of harmless and yet helpful dog training collars.

4 to 8 Dog Agility Jumps Makes Ideal Training

We are often asked, “How many jumps should I start with?” You can never have too many single jumps to practice agility. A good starting place is four jumps. This is the absolute minimum number of jumps that we recommend.

You can teach a variety of skills, drills, and exercises with four jumps. Four jumps will allow you to work on a short jump chute or jump grid. You can setup a “box” with your jumps and practice handling, collection, and 270 degree jumps. You can teach your dog jumping left and right. You can be outside the box and send your dog or you can handle from the inside of the box. Your jumps can be setup in a horizontal line, so that you can practice serpentines and treadles.

Go the next step and get eight jumps. Now you can setup two boxes with one introductory jump. You’ve now multiplied your drills that you can practice with your dog. Your jump grids can be of recommended size and quantity of jumps. You can also setup your jumps in a circle with the jump bars perpendicular to the circle or on the circumference of the circle. This pattern also enables you to train a variety of skills.

Your next consideration is a double jump and a triple jump. You could set two or three single jumps together to make your expanded jump, but having double and triple jump in your course work is really valuable to practice. We’ve seen many dogs run a clean course and the last obstacle is a triple and the dog is not prepared for it, and bang, down comes the bar.

You can really be ahead of the pack and have two sets of eight jumps. This is the ultimate in training because you can keep a jump grip up at all times that is separate from your course work, and have eight single jumps to have for course work. And when you include your double and triple, you can really practice all the jumping skills and drills necessary to get you those “Qs”.